Sale 359

U.S., British and Worldwide
Stamps, Documents and Autographs


Colonial Americana
 
 
Lot Photo Description
Lot 67
The Citizens of Hillsborough New Jersey confirms their support for the Continental Congress, large document on vellum, 13" x 13", no date, probably early 1776, the text in full: "The freeholders and inhabitants of Hillsborough, in the county of Somerset and provence of New Jersey having Long Viewed with Concern the Avowed Design of the Ministry of Great Britain to Raise a Revinue In America; Being Deeply affective with the Cruel Hostilities allready Comence in Massachusetts Bay for Carrying that Abritrary Design into Exectution; Convinced that the Preservation of the Rights and Priviledges of America Depends, under God on the firm union of its inhabitants, do, with hearts abhoring Slavery and ardently wishings for a Reconciliation with our parent State on Constitutional principles, Solomnly Associate Resolve under Sacred Ties of virtue, Honour and Love to our Country that we will Personally and as Far as our Influence Extends Endevor to Support and Cary into Execution whatever Measures may be Recommended by the Contitental Provincial Congresses Descending and our Constitution Preserving the Same Inviolate.
We Do allso Further Associate and agree as Far as Shall be Consistent with Measures Adopted for the Preservation of American Fredom do Suport the Magistrates as other Sivil Officers In the Executions of their Duty agreable to the Lawes of this Coloney and to observe our Committee acting according to the Resolutions of the aforesaid Continental Provincial Congresses Firmly Determined by all Means in our power to guard against those Disorders Confusion to which the peculiar Circumstances of the Times Expose us."
The document was signed by more than 30 citizens of Hillsborough. One small split and a couple of tiny unnoticeable holes, some worn areas but mostly quite readable, exceedingly rare. There are two or three more of these documents in historical societies, such as Salem County. We are not aware of any others in private hands.
A wonderful historic artifact of America at the beginning of the Revolutionary War, clearly showing what was disturbing the colonists about Great Britain's rule.
Estimate 4,000 - 5,000
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Lot 68
(Nicaragua Campaign) Letter from George King to James Bartlet, autograph letter signed, 4 pages, one address panel, 7" x 8½", Kingston (Jamaica), June 23, 1780, to Edinburgh. The letter begins with the expression of sympathy and regret at the passing of Lord Maitland. The writer then discusses British Military actions in Central America in 1780, in part: "we have lately taken the castle of St. Juan which commands the river that leads into the lake of Nicaragua. It is expected that our troops will get possession of the cities of Grenada and Leon situated on the lake." Fine.
Estimate 500 - 750
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Lot 69
AMERICAN WAR OF INDEPENDENCE, 10th July 1780 Letter (8 pages, without outer wrapper) headed "Camp near the River Brunse". It is likely that the writer was with General Sir Henry Clinton's forces in New York. The letter describes a recent engagement with "the whole Militia of the Country [New Jersey] join'd by a strong Part of Washington's Army who disputed every inch of ground. we advanc'd only. about 10 miles which cost us between 3 & 400 Men kill'd & wounded". The writer goes on to discuss the recent successful British siege of Charleston in which he was involved, the indecisive Naval Battle off Martinique, problems of communication with England on account of the French Fleet, etc. Together with this important Campaign Letter is an earlier letter from the same writer concerning an unnecessary detour to the Channel Islands in 1779 just after leaving England for America. Also four multi page letters (one with postal markings) referring to the writer of the other two letters, from which it appears that he was Colonel James Stuart, ensign of the First Regiment of Guards, who "lived with a woman by whom he has five children." and was the brother of Lord Blantyre (to whom all six letters were addressed). He was killed in America on 15th March 1781 at the Battle of Guilford, Connecticut. An excellent group, offering some fine insights into the period.
Estimate 750 - 1,000
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Lot 70
Amherst, Lord Jeffrey (1717-1797), British Military, Commander-in-Chief North America, war, Fought Successfully in New France during the Seven Year's war, autograph letter signed "Jeff Amherst", one sheet, 7½" x 9", Camp at Crown Point, November 21, 1759, to Colonel Broadstreet, discussing provisions at Forts Ticonderoga and the Landing, minor split and age stain, partly rebacked, Very Good, very readable, includes engraved portrait.
Estimate 500 - 750
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Lot 71
(Annexation of Texas)-John W. Jones (1791-1848), Congressman from Virginia (1835-1845), Speaker of the House (1843-1845), autographed letter signed as Speaker of the House, 8" x 10", Washington, January 30, 1845, discussing among other topics "the annexation of Texas to the United States" continuing "has passed the House of Representatives by a majority of twenty two votes, but has not yet been taken up in the Senate", minor edge flaws, small tear, Fine.
Estimate 150 - 200
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Lot 72
Carroll, Charles of Carrollton (1737-1832), Signer of the Declaration of Indepenence, Senator from Maryland, free franked Ch. Carroll of C "Free" on 1829 cover, red "free" and Baltimore c.d.s., January 26, docketed 1829, Fine, Carroll in 1828 as the last surviving signer was the only non-president granted the free franking privilege.
Estimate 300 - 400
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Lot 73
Cleaveland, Moses (1754-1806), Military Officer, known for being the Founder of Cleveland Ohio, autograph document signed "Moses Cleaveland Brigader General Fifth Brigade", one sheet 7½" x 12", Canterbury (CT), April 23, 1797, concerning a Captain Seth Clark, usual folds, small age stain, bold signature, Very Good, rare, and we are not aware of any autograph letter signed.
Estimate 400 - 500
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Lot 74
Gage, Thomas (1718/19-1787), British Army General, Commander-in-Chief at the Beginning of the Revolutionary War, autograph letter signed "Thomas Gage", one sheet, 7" x 9", Park Place, November 24th, 1775, writing to the Secretary of War Lord Barrington, in part, "I have the honor to transmit your lordship a list of promotions to be laid before his majesty for the sale of commissions in his regiments in Boston." Gage may well be attempting to replace the 1,000 British soldiers killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill in June, repaired tear, rebacked, otherwise Very Good.
Estimate 1,500 - 2,000
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Lot 75
Hancock, John (1737-1793), American Merchant, Statesman, and Noted Patriot, President of the Second Continental Congress and First Signer of the Declaration of Independence, free frank signature "John Hancock" as President of the Continental Congress, on folded cover opened to 8" x 6", Congress Baltimore, docketed on receipt, Dec 27, 1776, addressed in Hancock's hand to Joseph Trumbull, fresh with crisp writing and an excellent signature, framed.
Estimate 5,000 - 7,500

Congress had to flee Philadelphia due to British advances, and went to Baltimore for a short duration (Dec 20, 1776-Feb 27, 1777). Baltimore usages are quite scarce, especially with the desirable 1776 date.

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Lot 76
Hopkins, Esek (1718-1802), the Only Commander in Chief of the Continental Navy during the Revolutionary War— the Navy Equivalent of George Washington, Founding Member of the Order of Cincinnat, document signed "E. Hopkins", as a member of the Rhode Island General Assembly, one sheet, two sides, 3 1/2"x6" Rhode Island, Jaunary 6, 1783, Fine.
Estimate 150 - 200
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Lot 77
Huntington, Samuel (1731-1796), Signor of the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation, President of the Continental Congress, Governor of Connecticut, document signed as Governor, one sheet two sides, 8" x 11", Norwich Dec 9, 1791, a deposition with a note at bottom in his hand, testifying to deposing a Zachariah Huntington and signed there, plus an additional signature on reverse, some faults and tape stains, still good and quite legible.
Estimate 400 - 500
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Lot 78
Jay, John (1745-1829), American Statesman, President of the Continental Congress, Second Governor of New York, and First Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, hand addressed free franked envelope to his wife, as secretary of foreign affairs, docketed July 16, 1788, vertical fold does not affect signature, Fine.
Estimate 750 - 1,000
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Lot 79
Morris Jr., Robert (1734-1806), a Founding Father of the United States, signer of the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution, autograph letter signed, one page 7½" x 9½", December 9, 1794, to business associate John Nicholson, concerning merchant vessels, and he asks Nicholson, "have you any letters from the captains or owners to announce that they have brought back the money from their cargos.", a bit water stained though quite legible, the signature unaffected.
Estimate 500 - 750
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Lot 80
Penn, William (1644-1718), founder of Pennsylvania, early Quaker, autograph letter signed, "WM Penn", plus an additional postscript initialed "W.P.", and a note at the end of the inventory initialed "W.P." A most important letter by William Penn, accompanied by an inventory documenting the capture of some of Captain Kidd's "Pyrat" booty.

Seven pages 6¾" x 9¾", Philadelphia December 30, 1700, plus a three page inventory, 7½" x 11¾" in a secretarial hand. Penn's letter to British Minister James Vernon, discusses the property seized from George Thompson, William Orr, and Peter Lewis. The items are detailed on the accompanying inventory, which states, "An account of goods recvd from Captain Kidd's ship." These three gentlemen "affirmed they knew not the persons to be pirates." In addition, the letter itself discusses two unsavory characters of the era, Dr. Bradenham, surgeon to Captain Kidd and a Parson Portlock, both of whom were believed to be complicit in the handling of the notorious Kidd's treasure.
Wm. Penn continues with a complaint that men such as the Parson unfairly accuse Quakers of being dishonest in their claims of pacifism as they "inveigh agst ye Quakers for their being too tame and easy for pyrats and yt in the pulpit because they would not fit forth vessels of war to fight, persue & take them, while himself, at the same time stood possest of a pyrats treasure, gott by the worst of ways, needs no aggravation.
Penn concludes this correspondence with his initials after a plea for clemency for "a poor Sweetish woman" accused of killing her "basterd Childe".
The document includes a complete list of the pirate's booty that includes such things as sugar and a great number of various fabrics, including much silk. It is said pirates often used these textiles for their own clothing (silk held up well in the high humidity of the tropics) leading to the flamboyant costumes often associated with their ilk.
The letter has overall light toning and edge wear, but is quite legible. The inventory is fresh with minor toned spots. A transcript is available upon request.
Estimate 20,000 - 30,000
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Lot 81
Trumbull, Jonathan (1710-1785), Governor of Connecticut Before and During the Revolutionary War and was the Only Individual to be Governor for Any Colony as both a British Colony and an American State, document signed listing the payments to the twelve members of the House of Assistants (later House of Representatives), each "assistant" signing below his name, one sheet, four sides with docketing on a second side, 8" x 12" May 1762, among the other assistants is Matthew Griswold who succeeded Trumbull as governor in 1785.
Estimate 200 - 300
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Lot 82
Williams, William (1731-1811), Delegate to the Continental Congress from Connecticut and Signer of the Delcaration of Independence, small portion of the autograph document signed, 2" x 2", dated January 14, 1788, two sides, Fine.
Estimate 150 - 200
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